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Apple s new world with blemishes and flaws

(March 13, 2009)

DMN Newswire--2009-3-13-- At the beginning of every year, the CES and Macworld technology tradeshows provide ideal platforms for companies to unveil product innovations and to announce ground-breaking changes. In February of 2007, Apple used this platform to announce that they were discontinuing DRM copy protection on music. This communication strategy proved fruitful garnering Apple good publicity. In early 2009, Apple was back in the headlines with the next step in removing DRM under the heading "this time we're serious." In contrast to 2007 when only EMI was on board, all of the other major labels got with the program this time around giving consumers limitless freedom. Oh, if only there weren't any fine print.    

Wolf in sheep's clothing


Even though Apple presents itself publicly as fighting the good fight against DRM copy protection, consumer protection agencies however have not painted such a rosy picture of Apple, criticizing them publicly and taking action against the multinational corporation.  The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has criticized Apple's proprietary systems iPhone and iPod touch on various occasions due to the fact that, according to FSF, these systems only run applications found in the Apple Store, which are "protected" with subsequent layers of DRM copy protection. Just in time for Christmas 2008, FSF called on consumers to boycott the Apple Macbook, as they deemed its video playback functions to been laden with questionable restrictions. Apple then responded with an update of their playback software QuickTime. At the same time, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a US organization aimed at protecting civil liberties in the digital world, has criticized Apple's closed system, claiming the cryptographic technologies ensure that Apple playback software only communicates flawlessly with the intended corresponding iTunes software, thus putting alternative providers at a significant disadvantage. 


Freedom isn't free


Apple uses the word "update" on its website to describe removing copy protection from music and videos already purchased on iTunes. As was reported, Apple removes DRM from individual songs for 30 cents per song, albums for 30% of the album cost and videos for 60 cents each. Pretty fitting that Apple has named this service iTunes Plus, since customers had to paid for their music and videos once already.   

The price of DRM-free media has just gone up
At the same time, Apple, along with the music industry, restructured their pricing scheme. Current hits are more expensive than older tracks. The previous price barrier of 99 cents increased to $1.29. Prior to that, DRM-free music was available for iTunes for 99 cents.  

Alternatives and investing in the future
Consumers have always been at a disadvantage one way or the other. Today, consumers can hardly avoid problems with copy protection, incompatible playback software or various other technical difficulties. Since 2004, RapidSolution Software AG has been there to help by developing Windows software. Tunebite allows you to legally rerecord media if you should encounter problems with DRM copy protection or converts numerous file formats. In contrast to Apple's slow and cumbersome iTunes Plus, Tunebite premium "updates" your entire music collection in a fraction of the time, "updating" 54 times faster than iTunes Plus. Audiobooks, which have yet to be bestowed this new DRM-free freedom, can also be "updated" by Tunebite. Tunebite Premium can be downloaded at audials.com for 19.90 ?. After updating just a few records, Tunebite consumers will have more than their money's worth compared to Apple's Plus.        

Taking freedom seriously


Consumers looking to turn their back to the recording industry and their questionable M.O. can find solace in the best-selling PC software Radiotracker. Also available at audials.com, RapidSolution Software's Radiotracker Platinum is the number one selling web radio software in Germany and the UK and with its unique technology allows consumers to record their favorite music from over 77,000 artists on one of over 20,000 web radio stations. On average, Radiotracker takes about 15 seconds to find a corresponding web radio station and then starts recording songs specified by the user. Radiotracker Platinum can fulfill over 2,000 user music requests per minute. 

The all-in-one alternative solution for independent consumers


AudialsOne combines the award-winning Tunebite and Radiotracker Platiunum Editions, as well as other award-winning software by RapidSolution Software, in one pack. In doing so, AudialsOne provides unlimited legal freedom for consumers who want to be rid of copy protection and file format problems and for consumers who are looking for alternative ways to buy their music.   

About RapidSolution


RapidSolution Software AG is a leading technology-based company specializing in developing entertainment software. RapidSolution Software products can be purchased online at audials.com or in specialty stores around the world. Our best-known products include AudialsOne, Tunebite, Radiotracker and MP3videoraptor. According to GfK and Chart Track, Radiotracker Platimun is the best-selling PC-software in Germany and the UK for recording free customized music from web and social radio stations in the 2007/2008 period. Our slogan "cool and clever entertainment" is exemplified in our Audials product line, providing the innovative products of tomorrow at yesterday's prices.


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Related Keywords:Apple, iPod, iPhone, iTunes, DRM, copy, protection, Tunebite, software, remove, audio, video, files

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